We share a sea – a unique educational material

School children around the Baltic Sea will benefit from “We share a sea” a new teaching material about food, farming and the marine environment avialable in multiple languages.

School children around the Baltic Sea will benefit from “We share a sea” a new teaching material about food, farming and the marine environment  available in multiple languages. 

Textbook and assignments for free download

We share a sea ForsideWe share a sea” is an unusual teaching material published in multiple languages which allows international school cooperation across the Baltic Sea. The material is targeting students in 5th and 6th grade.

We share a sea consists of a textbook with a story that combines fiction and academic knowledge and a website – www.weshareasea.eu – in English with a teacher´s guide, assignments, suggestions for field trips, guidelines for science experiments and recipes for environmental friendly food.

The textbook is now available for free download as e-book in English, Danish and Lithuanian from the website. Printed versions in Danish can be order in the web shop at www.ecocouncil.dk and in Lithuanian by contacting Edita Zaromskiene at edita.zaromskiene@gmail.com. A Swedish, a German, a Finnish and an Estonian edition are planned to be published later in 2013.

 

Facts and fiction

The textbook We share a sea is a story about five children from Copenhagen who go on a mission to find out how the food they eat is related to the marine environment of the Baltic Sea. They travel widely. They visit a farmer and a fisherman. They get a big bag of fish and vegetables they can cook themselves using the principles of ‘a diet for a clean Baltic’.

The children end up making a “Baltic friendly” meal of organic vegetables from the farm, they have visited, and fish from the boat they were on board. On the way they get to understand how changing their own eating habits and consumption patterns can help improve the marine environment in the Baltic Sea.

In spite of being a fictional story We Share a Sea is relevant in both science and home economics. It aims at giving students an insight into important phenomena having to do with plant growth, livestock, food and farming as well as the marine environment but in an entertaining and easy-accessible way.

The scientific focus is on nutrients and nutrient cycles, leaching of nutrients from arable land, organic farming and food principles, oxygen depletion and fish mortality in the marine environment. Using the material allows the students to develop language, thoughts and ideas that will enable them to understand and discuss these issues and the relationship between them.

Cooperation around the Baltic Sea

We share a sea is published by the Ecological Council in cooperation with the EU-funded Baltic Project Beras Implementation, which involves environmental organizations and research and educational institutions in all the Baltic countries. As part of the cooperation the teaching material will be translated into most of the languages spoken in the Baltic region whereby the children get a unique opportunity to get to know students in other countries, communicate in English and exchange ideas, assignments, receips etc.

  • Published by: The Ecological Council, Copenhagen 2013.
  • Text: Ulla Skovsbøl
  • Illustrations and layout: Eva Wulff.
  • Translation: Jasmin Nielsen
  • Level: grade 5-6
  • Subjects: natural science, home economics, English, national language and interdisciplinary courses
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Forfatter Ulla Skovsbøl

I'm a journalist since twenty five years and a storyteller. Member of various networks of storytellers in Denmark.

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